Saturday , November 28 2020

Scientists have managed to partially restore the legs of the amputated frog



The results of the study are a new model of cellular stimulation and can lead to success in treating amputation injuries in humans.

Rana Dendropsophus kubricki.Pablo Venegas

A group of scientists at the American Tufts University, using a portable bioreactor registered in the explosion, partially restored the amputated frog by progesterone treatment, reports Cell Reports.

The results of the study are a new model of cellular stimulation and can lead to success in treating amputation injuries in humans.

Some species of animal species, such as lysers or crabs, can recover, but this study is well-known for the scientific name Xenopus laevis and does not occur in the African Jewelry Market.

This type of water bucket can restore the legs at an early stage of life, but lose the ability of an adult.

The researchers divided the golden eagles into three groups to carry out their experiment, and all of them were tied to a bioreactor that was transported instead of an amputated wound.

Only one group of diamonds received progesterone by means of a bioreactor within 24 hours, and the researchers noticed themselves after eighteen months, but did not see them in two other groups.

"The shorter use of the bioreactor and its beneficial load (progesterone) has transformed growth and tissue specimens into months," explains Michael Levin, a biologist at Allen Discovery Center at Toes University in Massachusetts. (USA)

Fangard-treated fars showed partial regeneration of the legs, bones, innervation, and vessels, and they were able to swim in the water as they were not amputated.

Prorgeoron is a prominent sex hormone associated with the onset and development of pregnancy and development, but also helps in the repair of nervous, arterial and bone tissue.

"We have looked at the progesterone as it will naturally affect the regeneration and regeneration. It also modulates the immune response to aid in treating and stimulates the growth of blood vessels and bones, "said Neiltonian scientist Celia Errero-Rincon.

The next step in the research is to prove that mammals can be a new model for testing therapeutic cocktails that can lead to resuscitation in a non-regenerative species, such as a similar study of mammals and combinations of narcotic drugs.

Millions of people around the world have few, low or high amputations, and only in the United States two million people are in this situation.


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