Saturday , October 23 2021

Stan Lee, the first black super-heroes of the world, was against the real world racism



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Stan Lee Myas is part of Krommell's childhood. As a young, black girl and self-propelled pop culture, she saw that Lee was premature.

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At that time he wrote "Black Panther" when segregation was still hard, – says New Yorker, 27, who was influenced by Lie as a graphic designer and comic artist. "It was not supposed to be a black hero, not just a second-handed, but a thematic hero."

The master and publisher of the biggest super heroes of Marvel Lie died on Monday at the age of 95. Fans point out their contribution to the canon of pop culture, and some say that the Marvel Master has a great sense of responsibility with great comic books. In the 1960s, when the black people harbored discrimination and discrimination in places where they lived and worked, Lee introduced the first major black superhero. Black Panther, X-Men, and Luke Cage, today's screen characters. But then they were the soldiers of Li in the war against racism and xenophobia.

Under the guise of Lee, Marvel Comicus introduced the African prince, who heads the mythical and technologically advanced kingdom, to the funny books readers, his brown brown skins and the X-Men as dark legends and their cultural heritage.

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The works and ideas of artists behind Lee and Talla, the Black Panther; Luke Cage, Hero for hiring; and Professor Javier's funny mutants group – the innovation of the 1960s and 1970s – has become a cultural barrier to integration.

Li Marvel's all fingers have been released, but some characters and story lines have come from artists inspired by events of the '60s, "freelance writer Alex Simmons said.

However, when it came to black heroes and characters, there was some pressure from the white comic distributors. Some of Marvel's comic book was sent back, as some distributors were not prepared for the Black Panther and Wakanda Kingdom, developed by artist and co-author Jack Curby.

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"Stan had to take these risks," Simmons said. "There was a Liberty movement, and I think Marvel has a voice of the people, and he has been with him in rebellious energy."

Lee spoke directly about the foolishness of the readers. A year in 1968, when he saw the murder of Martin Luther King, Lee wrote his most famous column, "The Soapbox", to the fanatics and racism, "the most dangerous of all, the deadest of today's world."

"But, unlike a group of dear super-racial groups, they can not be beaten or beaten by raiding weapons," Lee wrote.

According to Mikhail Lubanski, who teaches racial and ethnic psychology in Urban-Champaign University in the state of Illinois, Marvel's heroes have always stood out as to how to deal with racial and other forms of discrimination. With the X-Men, many readers saw the mutilated persecuted for their power as an explanation of the way Americans treat others with contempt.

WATCH: The founder of the Marvel Comic Book, Stan Lee, died at the age of 95





"The original X-Men is a little about the race and cultural differences," said Lubanski. "Black Panther and some (Marvel) films took the mantle, racked it up, and thought that Stan did not intend. But it was a great tool for them. "

Efforts to minimize minority characters are not so old. Famous manuscripts with fights like Manchu-American Manardin and Birth American athlete Vayatt Wingfoot is considered to be a novelty in the 1960s and 1970s, but even when viewed through the 21st century lens, it may seem stereotypical.

"That's fun. Stan Lee gets the hero's credit and fault, "says William Foster III, an inventor of the East Coast Black Age Comics Convention, and an English professor at Naughatuk Dolin College in Connecticut, Connecticut.

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Foster, who studied Marvel Comicster in the 1960s, even said that he was doing something under the age of monumental as the people on the white background.

"Stan Lee is in New York City. How can we not be black in New York? "Said Foster.

The blocks began to take on the role of characters and evil. According to Foster, characters may sometimes be "Tokenism," but sometimes this progress must begin.

For 10 years, Marvel Cinematic Universe has surpassed $ 17.6 billion worldwide. The film "Black Panther" at the beginning of this year has collected more than $ 200 million on its debut weekend. Next year, actress Bri Larson will fly as Captain Marvel. Miles Morales' multiplayer film, the Pauper-Roman teenager, falls next month, when he owns the Spider-Man suit. And around Camal Khan's interest is a.ka.a Marvel, the first Muslim superhero.

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"I also had many friends," says freelance writer Simmons. "We've seen Batman, and we've also watched the" Moderator "- my personal belief – if you put the material in front of people and you contact them, they will contact you."

For many fans and consumers, it tells about the product, not skin color or sexual orientation.

Kulmell, a ridiculous artist, for Asian and unfortunately, believes that the representation of women in comic books will improve.

"I think they are now seeing a comic book. It's not a real group right now, "says Krolmell. "It's not just African-American women, it's Asians, Spanish heroes. I will break down the barriers to Stan Lee. "

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